Healthy Pregnancy Diet

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Having a balanced & Healthy diet during pregnancy is one of the most rewarding things you can do for yourself and your baby. What you eat will never be more important than during pregnancy. Any decision about what you eat or not directly affects your baby’s well-being.

A healthy pregnancy diet promotes the growth and development of your baby and determines the basic nutritional health with which you are born. It is also true that what you eat while you are pregnant will serve as a model for your baby’s eating habits as soon as they are born. Simply put, if you would like your child to enjoy your veggies, you can have it yourself while you are still pregnant.

Healthy Pregnancy Diet Videos

Healthy Pregnancy Diet Videos


A healthy pregnancy diet will keep you healthy during your pregnancy, improve your chances of a normal pregnancy and childbirth and make your pregnancy books easier after the baby’s birth.

With so much to do while you are pregnant and making so many changes and adjustments, it will probably feel like a full-time job to ensure that you always eat properly; For you and baby. But it doesn’t have to be that hard.

If you have already eaten healthily, you know that you can never be wrong with lean protein, fruit, vegetables and whole wheat. If you are pregnant, however, you must pay special attention to some foods.

So, first, it’s important that you understand what nutrients you need most and where you can find them. A dietitian can guide you through a healthy pregnancy diet, but you’ll probably find it cheaper to simply become familiar with the food groups and nutrients and work out a diet that works for you. This way your healthy diet can go beyond pregnancy.

The learning of food groups, minerals, and vitamins, which can sometimes hardly be pronounced, can be somewhat daunting at first, but this is a case in which the end justifies the means perfectly. You will be glad that you have taken your pregnancy diet into your hands when you see all the evidence in the baby you are holding and when you come out of pregnancy and love your body and condition and do not absolutely hate it.

Doctors recommend that, while you are pregnant, you increase your usual portions of a variety of foods from five basic food groups to include the following:

o 3-4 portions of fruit and vegetables
o 9 portions of wholemeal bread or fortified bread, cereal, rice or pasta for energy
o 3 portions of milk, yogurt, and cheese for calcium
o 3 of meat, poultry, fish, eggs, nuts, dried beans and peas for protein

What nutrients do you need? Why do you need them? Where can you find them?

Vitamin A & Beta-carotene (700 mcg daily)

For the development of strong teeth and bones
Spinach, broccoli, liver, milk, pumpkin, eggs, carrots, spinach, green and yellow fruits and vegetables,

Folate/folic acid (600 mcg daily)

Supports the placenta, reduces the risk of neural tube defects, including spina bifida
Green leafy vegetables, oranges, strawberries, peas, nuts, beans, spinach, beets, cauliflower, fortified cereals, pasta

Thiamine/B1 (1.4 mg daily)

Regulates the nervous system and improves the energy level
Pork, nuts, pasta, eggs, berries, legumes, whole grains, fortified cereals, rice

Zinc (11-12 mg daily)

Helps in the production of insulin and enzymes
Dairy products, whole grain products and fortified cereal products, beans, red meat and nuts

Vitamin D (5 mcg daily)

Development of strong teeth and bones
Milk and fat fish

Riboflavin/B2 (1.4 mg)

Improves eyesight and appearance of healthy skin
Eggs, fortified cereals, dairy products, fish, poultry

Vitamin C (80-85 mg)

Helps the body absorb iron, builds a healthy immune system, protects tissues from damage
Broccoli, citrus fruits, green beans, strawberries, papaya, potatoes, tomatoes

Calcium (1,000-1,300 mg daily)

Helps to build bones and teeth buds of the baby, helps to prevent blood clots, helps your body to regulate fluids, helps the function of muscles and nerves
Yogurt, milk, cheddar cheese, with calcium enriched foods such as soy milk, juices, bread, cereals, dark green leafy vegetables,

Protein (60 mg daily)

Helps in the production of amino acids, improves blood circulation and repairs cells
Most animal foods, meat, poultry, eggs, dairy products, vegetarian burgers, beans, legumes, nuts

Vitamin E (15 mg daily)

Helps body shape and use of red blood cells and muscles
Vegetable oil, nuts, spinach, fortified cereals

Iron (27 mg daily)
Helps body shape and use of red blood cells and muscles
Vegetable oil, nuts, spinach, fortified cereals

Iron (27 mg daily)

Helps in the production of hemoglobin, increases blood volume and prevents anemia, prevents low birth weight and premature birth
Beef, pork, dried beans, spinach, dried fruit, wheat germs, oat flakes or grains fortified with iron

Pyridoxine/B6 (1.9 mg daily)

Helps to form red blood cells, helps with morning sickness
Chicken, fish, liver, pork, eggs, soybeans, carrots, cabbage, peas, spinach, sunflower seeds, bananas, beans, broccoli, brown rice, oats, bran, peanuts, walnuts

Niacin/B3 (18 mg daily)

Promotes healthy skin, nerves, and digestion
High-protein foods, fortified cereals, and bread, meat, fish, milk, eggs, peanuts

During pregnancy, some foods may harm your developing baby, so be sure to cook your whole meat thoroughly to expose salmonella and other harmful bacteria.

The learning of food groups, minerals, and vitamins, which can sometimes hardly be pronounced, can be somewhat daunting at first, but this is a case in which the end justifies the means perfectly. You will be glad that you have taken your pregnancy diet into your hands when you see all the evidence in the baby you are holding and when you come out of pregnancy and love your body and condition and do not absolutely hate it.

Remember that it is never too late to start a healthy pregnancy diet, no matter how close you are to the day!

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